Focaccia veneta and the “Tre Colli” Recioto di Soave!

Our Recioto di Soave “Tre Colli” finds its best match in the focaccia veneta… And it’s immediately Easter!

Fugassa’ is one of the Easter sweets originating in the Veneto region, with very ancient origins. Tradition has it that the focaccia veneta was invented by a baker from Treviso who, on the occasion of Easter, added other ingredients to the bread dough, such as eggs, butter and sugar, all in moderate quantities given the costs, thus obtaining a soft and sweet bread to give to his customers. Also called “fugassin”, this was originally a poor man’s cake, but with the passing of time many confectioners welcomed it into their kitchens, modifying the recipe and making it more structured: in fact, for focaccia veneta to be so soft it needs 4 leavening periods.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS FOR THE FIRST DOUGH (FOR A 750 GR Mould)
Flour mix of manitoba and 00 50 g
Sugar 20 g
Whole milk at room temperature 80 g
Dry brewer’s yeast 4 g
FOR THE SECOND
DoughFlour mix of manitoba and 00 150 g
Sugar 20 g
Eggs (approx. 1) 60 g
Butter softened at room temperature 30 g
FOR THE THIRD Dough
Flour mix of manitoba and 00 100 g
Sugar 20 g
Eggs (approx. 1) 60 g
Butter softened at room temperature 30 g
FOR THE FOURTH DOUGH
Manitoba and 00 mix flour 200 g
Sugar 40 g
Egg (1) 56 g
Fine salt 10 g
Vanilla pod 1
Orange peel 1
Lemon peel 1
White rum 10 g
Softened butter at room temperature 40 g
TO GUARN
Albums 30 g
Frosted sugar 20 g
Granulated sugar 20 g

PREPARATION OF 1ST DOUGH (LEAVEN)

To prepare the focaccia veneta, start by sifting together 250 g of type 00 flour and 250 g of manitoba flour, so as to obtain a flour with the right strength, this quantity will be sufficient for all the subsequent mixtures. It is also important that all the ingredients are at a similar temperature in order to make the focaccia veneta. Once you have your flour mix, mix it with a spoon and take 50 g, then place it in another bowl and add 20 g of sugar.

Add 4 g of dehydrated brewer’s yeast and pour in 80 g of milk (at room temperature), stirring with a fork until the batter is smooth and free of lumps.

Now cover with cling film and leave to rise in the oven with the light switched off for 1 hour or until it has doubled in volume and bubbles have appeared on the surface.

2ND DOUGH

Only now can you proceed to make the second dough: pour 150 g of the flour mix and 20 g of sugar into the bowl of a planetary mixer fitted with the dough hook, add the yeast and add the egg, beaten slightly and always at room temperature.

Start kneading the dough at medium speed for 2-3 minutes. 4, then add 30 g of butter (at room temperature) in two, waiting for the first piece to be absorbed before moving on to the second and continue to knead the dough for a further 6-7 minutes until it is well combined.

At this point, transfer the dough onto a work surface with the help of a corkscrew, shape it into a ball and place it in a bowl, cover with cling film and leave it to rise again in the oven with the light switched off for 4 hours until it has doubled in volume.

3RD DOUGH

Then proceed with the third dough: pour into the bowl of the planetary mixer (always equipped with a hook) 100 g of the flour mix previously prepared and 20 g of sugar. Add the second dough, run the machine on medium speed and add the egg (at room temperature).

Wait 2-3 minutes and add 30 g of soft butter a little at a time and continue to knead the dough until it is well combined. Now transfer it to a work surface and fold the dough with your hands, pulling the outer edges of the dough inwards to give it greater strength.

Place in a bowl and cover with cling film. Put it back in the oven with the light switched off for about 1 hour, until it has doubled in volume.

4TH DOUGH

At this point take care of the 4th and last dough: pour 200 g of the flour mix into the bowl of the planetary mixer, add 40 g of sugar, the third dough, the previously beaten egg and knead everything for a few minutes.

Add the rum, allow it to be absorbed and, in the meantime, grate the rind of one orange and one lemon. Then add the salt, the seeds of a vanilla pod and the zest of the citrus fruit to the planetary mixer. Finally, add 40 g of softened butter a little at a time 8 and wait until the dough is well combined. Transfer it to a pastry board and fold it again 10 before giving it a spherical shape. Transfer it to a bowl 11 and cover as usual with cling film and leave it to rise in the fridge for 15 hours, then leave it to rise at room temperature for about 2 hours.

FORMING THE FOCACCIA VENETA

Now transfer the dough to a lightly floured pastry board, fold it in again and shape it into a ball. Transfer it inside a 750 g cardboard panettone mould and put it in the oven with the light switched off for about 2 hours, until the dough has almost reached the edge. Leave it at room temperature for a few minutes to dry the outside slightly and in the meantime prepare the icing by lightly whipping the egg whites with the icing sugar until frothy but not stiff. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a cross into the surface of the focaccia and brush the icing all over the top. Sprinkle with granulated sugar and bake in a static oven preheated to 170 ° (ventilated oven is not recommended) for 30 minutes, then cover with silver paper and continue cooking for another 20 minutes. To make sure the focaccia is cooked, you can always do a toothpick test. Once baked, let your focaccia veneta cool down before serving!

 

Source: Giallo Zafferano Blog – https://ricette.giallozafferano.it/Focaccia-Veneta.html

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on reddit
Share on telegram
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Check availability
Discover also:
Where we are?
You will find us
in Hall 5 - Stand f3